Month: March 2017

Welcoming Spring with Geggamoja

Yesterday was the first day of spring and we could feel the warmth coming back. The sunny days are back and we can see green leaves and beautiful daffodils everywhere. But spring is also coming with rain showers so let’s get ourselves ready for it! Spring has always been our favourite season with the girls as you can do so many activities and enjoy to go out. We have been really busy last week planting our potatoes from the #growyourownpotatoes project and sowing some tree seeds from The woodland trust. It so exciting to see the natural cycles of life and gardening is a beautiful, engaging and quiet activity to do with young children. So as beautiful days are coming back, I thought it was the time to use again some bright and lightweight clothes to accommodate the new climat. So today baby is wearing a Geggamoja outfit from the Spring/Summer 2017 Collection. Do you remember? I wrote a review last year about this wonderful Scandinavian brand, click here if you would like to know more. …

The specificity of Montessori Materials

Montessori materials are quite unique and once you discover all of them, I promise you that you are going to be fascinated and never look back again. All of them are linked together while having a specific goal. Montessori materials invite activity. Each of the Montessori apparatus brings you to explore by the forms, colours and engage all the senses to help learn. The specificity of Montessori materials are that each of them isolates one quality. For example, the pink tower is made up of ten pink cubes of varying sizes. The child constructs a tower with the largest cube on the bottom and the smallest on top. This material isolates the concept of dimensions. The cubes are all the same colour and texture; the only difference is their size. The aim of this apparatus is to help the child feel with all his senses the variation in size by the weight, length, etc. Other materials isolate different concepts for example, the colour tablets for the colours, the geometry materials for forms, and so on. Moreover, all Montessori materials are …

Eight months update: Baby’s milestones – From Babies With Love Whale Baby grow

Recently, Baby turned up seven months old. I cannot believe how fast she has grown but that’s it: she is not my little newborn anymore. We have started weaning at six and a half months even if she was showing lots of readiness signs but she has been poorly in January and I thought we’d rather delay a bit. Because baby is still toothless I started with purees and it worked for approximately two weeks. Then, little by little, she started refusing spoon feeding and willing to feed herself. How can a baby with only gums eat a cucumber? I have no idea but she is managing! She is not a tummy baby. As soon as I put her on her tummy, she turns back. But recently, not to say few days ago, she eventually decided to sit unsupported! What a joy! Never compare babies are they all reach their milestones at their own pace. So let’s see together what we might expect from an 8 months old baby based on Bounty. Dropping and throwing They say: …

Montessori for Infants: Heuristic play and Treasure Baskets

Recently, treasure baskets have been really all over the places and I am sure you have crossed them or at least heard these words somewhere. They are selling as a set or you can buy parts to make your own. This is how you might have heard about them. But at the end, what is it all about? Where does it come from? And what does it stand for? Treasure Baskets are an extension of a concept developed in the early 1980’s by Elinor Goldschmied and Sonia Jackson in their book, People under Three, called HEURISTIC PLAY. What does Heuristic play means? Heuristic play is rooted in young children’s natural curiosity. As babies grow, they move beyond being content to simply feel and ponder objects, to wanting to find out what can be done with them. Toddlers have an urge to handle things: to gather, fill, dump, stack, knock down, select and manipulate in other ways. Household or kitchen utensils offer this kind of activity as every parent knows, and can occupy a child for surprising stretches …

The Five key learning areas of a Montessori classroom

During my research about Montessori, I have discovered something very fascinating: the five key learning areas. The fact that learning is divided into five subjects and that these subjects are all linked together, I thought it was genius. Then discovering all the Montessori apparatus and all what Montessori has done, I was definitely converted. In a Montessori classroom, you will normally find these five areas separated with the designated materials. At home, depending on the space you have and if you are looking to recreate a classroom, you can try to follow the learning areas or just put things together on your shelves. We are trying to set up a classroom so we are following this as much as we can. So a Montessori classroom is divided in five areas: the Sensorial area: The Sensorial area of the classroom helps children become more aware of smaller details that are often overlooked. Each sensorial activity focuses on one important quality such as colour, weight, shape, size, texture, sound or smell. For examples, the knobbed cylinders and colour tablets. Sensorial activities …

Montessori at Home – How to create an appropriate environment?

So the first step of our Montessori at Home Project has been to change our environment. The first room where we made the changes was our, what we used to call, Playroom. One of the main aspect of the Montessori philosophy is to keep the environment in order and tidy , the aim of it is to obtain a calm atmosphere. “The environment must be rich in motives which lend interest to activity and invite the child to conduct his own experiences.” Maria Montessori For Maria Montessori, the first three years of life are precious as she called it the “Absorbent Mind”. So the home is the first place a child is going to evolve so we should try to make the most of it first. “The first phase of the child’s development goes from birth to, let us say, six years of age. At this stage the child is partly at home, partly in school. The plane of education should take both the situations into consideration.” (Maria Montessori – Four Planes of Education, p. 2) Maria Montessori observed …