All posts tagged: Montessori Materials

Montessori for Infants and toddlers: Object Permanence Skills and Imbucare Box

When you look for Montessori materials for infants and Toddlers , the most well known are the Object permanence Boxes and Imbucare Boxes. But what is it and what does it refer to?  The object permanence boxes – whether it is wooden or an empty tissue box – is referred to as “imbucare” which is Italian for “post”, as in post a letter in a mailbox. When you put something INSIDE of something (ball in box, shell in drawer), that is imbucare. Any activity where the child uses his hands to put something ONTO something (“infilare”) or INTO something (“imbucare”), it aids in the development of the hand which ultimately aids in the development of the brain and the flourish of neural connections. Posting objects into boxes is a natural inclination for young children. This activity gives the child practice with hand-eye co-ordination as the soft ball is pushed through the hole. The shape is then retrieved from the front of the box in the drawer to repeat the activity over and over. The Skill involved in these activities is the Object …

The specificity of Montessori Materials

Montessori materials are quite unique and once you discover all of them, I promise you that you are going to be fascinated and never look back again. All of them are linked together while having a specific goal. Montessori materials invite activity. Each of the Montessori apparatus brings you to explore by the forms, colours and engage all the senses to help learn. The specificity of Montessori materials are that each of them isolates one quality. For example, the pink tower is made up of ten pink cubes of varying sizes. The child constructs a tower with the largest cube on the bottom and the smallest on top. This material isolates the concept of dimensions. The cubes are all the same colour and texture; the only difference is their size. The aim of this apparatus is to help the child feel with all his senses the variation in size by the weight, length, etc. Other materials isolate different concepts for example, the colour tablets for the colours, the geometry materials for forms, and so on. Moreover, all Montessori materials are …

Montessori for Infants: Heuristic play and Treasure Baskets

Recently, treasure baskets have been really all over the places and I am sure you have crossed them or at least heard these words somewhere. They are selling as a set or you can buy parts to make your own. This is how you might have heard about them. But at the end, what is it all about? Where does it come from? And what does it stand for? Treasure Baskets are an extension of a concept developed in the early 1980’s by Elinor Goldschmied and Sonia Jackson in their book, People under Three, called HEURISTIC PLAY. What does Heuristic play means? Heuristic play is rooted in young children’s natural curiosity. As babies grow, they move beyond being content to simply feel and ponder objects, to wanting to find out what can be done with them. Toddlers have an urge to handle things: to gather, fill, dump, stack, knock down, select and manipulate in other ways. Household or kitchen utensils offer this kind of activity as every parent knows, and can occupy a child for surprising stretches …

The Five key learning areas of a Montessori classroom

During my research about Montessori, I have discovered something very fascinating: the five key learning areas. The fact that learning is divided into five subjects and that these subjects are all linked together, I thought it was genius. Then discovering all the Montessori apparatus and all what Montessori has done, I was definitely converted. In a Montessori classroom, you will normally find these five areas separated with the designated materials. At home, depending on the space you have and if you are looking to recreate a classroom, you can try to follow the learning areas or just put things together on your shelves. We are trying to set up a classroom so we are following this as much as we can. So a Montessori classroom is divided in five areas: the Sensorial area: The Sensorial area of the classroom helps children become more aware of smaller details that are often overlooked. Each sensorial activity focuses on one important quality such as colour, weight, shape, size, texture, sound or smell. For examples, the knobbed cylinders and colour tablets. Sensorial activities …

Montessori at home

In September last year, #1 started at reception year and she was five. One of the challenges was to teach her reading. She knew her alphabets and was eager to learn but quite rapidly we realised that she was struggling with the concept of blending. It was just like putting some toothed wheels together and not knowing how and where to start the mechanic. #1 suffers from ASD, she is high functional which means that her struggles are more subtle but they are here and we try to help her as much as we can each time we have one in front of us. Since baby, I used to work with her with the Montessori pedagogy but just by doing some Montessori inspired activities. I never drown myself into it properly. I just liked the fact to involve a young child in our day to day life and let her be. At two, she was folding the clothes with me, cooking with me and able to snack by herself. All these little engaging things we …